“I participated in an in-home product trial study. A coffee machine company sent me one of the coffee makers along with about 200 coffee pods. I received $7 for completing 3 short surveys. Plus, after the study, the company said I could keep the coffee maker. So, I got like 4 mos of coffee for everyone in my household, a free coffee maker and $7!” - David W.
MintVine is a cool looking paid survey site that makes it easy to complete a survey, without having to spend too long learning how to do it. One of the things I liked most about MintVine is that they offer a huge amount of ways to get paid: there’s the old favorite PayPal of course, but you can also choose Starbucks cards, Amazon and other gift cards, and even restaurant cards. Your surveys can pay for your next meal, and it’s easy to rack up points here. Some users have reported delays in receiving payments however, but this isn’t a scam and MintVine are working hard to speed up their process and iron our any glitches. If they do, they could be heading into the Survey Cool top ten in 2018.
Kwik Surveys is a free option that is ad-supported. You can’t customize the templates, but the tool has 30+ to choose from, some of which are nothing short of adorable (you can have a floral theme, or play host to an encouraging group of penguins in your top margin). A handful of the simpler designs are ready to embed on your website, making it even easier for you to collect responses.
Companies are certainly catching onto the trend, and most have the flexibility to work from home, if not at all the time, at least when needed. It’s changing the way we work, especially in the tech sphere. And while it may not be for everybody, employers may find they can save money and increase productivity for some workers. And for some employees, work-from-home benefits may be the difference between an enjoyable and stressful work life.
But once you’re in your home office—alone, every day—you might start to miss that collegial camaraderie. Since the UPS incident, I’ve reached out more to colleagues via IM and will post cute pics of my new puppy for my colleagues to see on Yammer. And when we’re on deadline, we even (gasp!) talk on the phone. It’s helped tremendously to make the disconnect not feel so severe. It’s a good balance between having peace and quiet when you need it and much-needed interaction with others, too.
Perhaps the most important part of the survey process is the creation of questions that accurately measure the opinions, experiences and behaviors of the public. Accurate random sampling and high response rates will be wasted if the information gathered is built on a shaky foundation of ambiguous or biased questions. Creating good measures involves both writing good questions and organizing them to form the questionnaire.
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Its drag-and-drop editor is touch-ready, so you can put together a survey from any device. There are standard survey elements you'd expect, each with large buttons that are easy to tap on mobile. And, you can include a media gallery in a question, where you can use large images as questions to let people pick a graphical option in your survey—perhaps to say which food looks most tempting.
Focus groups are very different from pilot tests because people discuss the survey topic or respond to specific questions in a group setting, often face to face (though online focus groups are sometimes used). When conducting focus groups, the surveyor typically gathers a group of people and asks them questions, both as a group and individually. Focus group moderators may ask specific survey questions, but often focus group questions are less specific and allow participants to provide longer answers and discuss a topic with others. Focus groups can be particularly helpful in gathering information before developing a survey questionnaire to see what topics are salient to members of the population, how people understand a topic area and how people interpret questions (in particular, how framing a topic or question in different ways might affect responses). For these types of focus groups, the moderator typically asks broad questions to help elicit unedited reactions from the group members, and then may ask more specific follow-up questions.

Questions with ordinal response categories – those with an underlying order (e.g., excellent, good, only fair, poor OR very favorable, mostly favorable, mostly unfavorable, very unfavorable) – are generally not randomized because the order of the categories conveys important information to help respondents answer the question. Generally, these types of scales should be presented in order so respondents can easily place their responses along the continuum, but the order can be reversed for some respondents. For example, in one of the Pew Research Center’s questions about abortion, half of the sample is asked whether abortion should be “legal in all cases, legal in most cases, illegal in most cases, illegal in all cases” while the other half of the sample is asked the same question with the response categories read in reverse order, starting with “illegal in all cases.” Again, reversing the order does not eliminate the recency effect but distributes it randomly across the population.


Companies might also retain more employees if they enact a work from home benefit. Stanford professor, Nick Bloom, conducted a study to evaluate the benefits of working from home. He found workers were more productive, got more done, worked longer hours, took less breaks, and used less sick time than their in-office counterparts. These employees were also happier and quit less than those who went into the office on a regular basis. He estimated that, on average, the company saved about $2,000 per every employee who worked from home.
One other challenge in developing questionnaires is what is called “social desirability bias.” People have a natural tendency to want to be accepted and liked, and this may lead people to provide inaccurate answers to questions that deal with sensitive subjects. Research has shown that respondents understate alcohol and drug use, tax evasion and racial bias; they also may overstate church attendance, charitable contributions and the likelihood that they will vote in an election. Researchers attempt to account for this potential bias in crafting questions about these topics. For instance, when Pew Research Center surveys ask about past voting behavior, it is important to note that circumstances may have prevented the respondent from voting: “In the 2012 presidential election between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, did things come up that kept you from voting, or did you happen to vote?” The choice of response options can also make it easier for people to be honest; for example, a question about church attendance might include three of six response options that indicate infrequent attendance. Research has also shown that social desirability bias can be greater when an interviewer is present (e.g., telephone and face-to-face surveys) than when respondents complete the survey themselves (e.g., paper and web surveys).
Want an easy way to keep track of who's taken your survey? If you're sending your survey to your existing contacts, or the leads you've been working with in your CRM, then you'll want to note their survey responses right along with their other contact info. Just connect your survey builder to your CRM app—and make sure your survey asks for an email address—and each person's survey answers can show up on their profile in your CRM automatically.
SurveyMethods can also help you make traditional surveys, with its survey library or an editor where you'll add one question at a time. You can gather responses anonymously, if you need, or print your survey and poll people at your events or stores. Or, you can import your email marketing list, and use SurveyMethods to send your survey to everyone at once.
If you'd like to tweak your survey's design, there are a few basic templates you can choose from, or you can design your own in CSS. Then, you can share your survey online, or export as a PDF and get answers offline—and then later type those offline entries into Obsurvey's database to keep all of your survey responses together. It's not the prettiest or most advanced survey tool, but it promises "surveys made simple" and lives up to that well.

Companies, brands, and organizations from around the globe are constantly seeking the opinions of people just like you to help shape the products they develop and how they market them. They count on paid online surveys to provide them with reliable information. If you spend time online and enjoy giving your opinion, paid surveys are a great way to earn a little extra cash while helping these companies.
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