Now, don’t get me wrong. There are people who do make a few thousand dollars or more a year with paid surveys. But that’s not the norm. If you do want to increase your earnings substantially, your best bet is to also join focus groups (we have a big list of ’em. Just do a quick search on Google for “moneypantry.com focus groups”). They pay much more between $50 to $400 or more per focus group secession.

A questionnaire, like a conversation, should be grouped by topic and unfold in a logical order. It is often helpful to begin the survey with simple questions that respondents will find interesting and engaging to help establish rapport and motivate them to continue to participate in the survey. Throughout the survey, an effort should be made to keep the survey interesting and not overburden respondents with several difficult questions right after one another. Demographic questions such as income, education or age should not be asked near the beginning of a survey unless they are needed to determine eligibility for the survey or for routing respondents through particular sections of the questionnaire. Even then, it is best to precede such items with more interesting and engaging questions.
In fact, opening the talent pool seems to be one of the biggest employer benefits when it comes to a work from home policy. Jessica Greenwalt, Founder of Pixelkeet and Co-Founder of CrowdMed says, “Pixelkeet has been able to attract very talented designers and developers who want to live the freelance lifestyle without having to fish for work on their own. It's also been easy for us to work with clients from around the globe because we have a team member in a timezone convenient for communicating with most clients.”
Create a new survey—or employ a pre-made template—and you'll find a survey editor where each question is on its own page with a unique, full-width background image. Instead of having theme options for the entire survey, you can tweak the font, color, opacity and more for each question. And there's still the survey tools you'd expect—tons of question types, branching and logic, and more—inside the fanciest surveys you'll ever see.
Working remotely for an established company is similar to working a desk job except you get to work at home. Most jobs require you to chat with customers online or via the phone, but their biggest draw is the fact that you’ll earn an hourly wage and receive a (relatively) steady paycheck. You’ll usually be asked to work regular hours, but you can do it in your pajamas if you’d like. Even better, some companies might actually provide you with benefits.
Yes, "poll" is in the name, but Polldaddy is also great at making surveys. It's also among the most affordable survey tools, with unlimited surveys and responses for free. Polldaddy's survey editor is nice, with options to embed media from YouTube, Flickr, Google Maps and more. You can receive your responses via email or RSS and set a date or entry quota to automatically close your survey automatically after it reaches that number.
Everyone on your team can add questions and multimedia you want to include in a survey, and share it with each other. Then, when it's time to make the final survey, you can pull everything in together and make the final survey in minutes. Finally, you can share your results page with a download or with an online, password-protected dashboard, so everyone can get the feedback immediately.
Because of concerns about the effects of category order on responses to closed-ended questions, many sets of response options in Pew Research Center’s surveys are programmed to be randomized (when questions have two or more response options) to ensure that the options are not asked in the same order for each respondent. For instance, in the example discussed above about what issue mattered most in people’s vote, the order of the five issues in the closed-ended version of the question was randomized so that no one issue appeared early or late in the list for all respondents. Randomization of response items does not eliminate order effects, but it does ensure that this type of bias is spread randomly.

That’s not to say that blogging isn’t a real work-from-home option. I personally know dozens of people who make more than six figures a year from their blog, including my own family. In fact, I’d highly encourage you to start a blog if you feel inclined. Eventually, it can be a great source of residual income. Just don’t go into it thinking you’re going to make a ton of money right out of the gate.
Among those tools, you'll find the features you need to be creative with your survey, including options to let your contacts capture images, record audio and video, and upload files from your survey. You can upload photos of your own, store them in Surveypal, and reuse them later in your surveys—and you can add custom code to your survey to track analytics and more. You'll get the same great survey features, with an extra dose of creativity.

It's not all about your own records. Your contacts and customers took the time to take your survey, so it'd be nice for you to take a minute and say thank you. But it doesn't even have to take a minute of your time. All you need to do is have Zapier automatically send an email to each person who fills out your survey. You could even include extra info about your company, or perhaps a special coupon code as an extra thanks.
They used to be cash-only, but in 2013 they switched over to a points system. Panelists can share their opinions in surveys and complete other various offers in exchange for points. 100 points is equal to $1, and most of their surveys pay up to $3. Survey topics are diverse and cover a variety of different topics. Pinecone Research is unique in that they emphasize consumption related surveys more than other panels.
You can have as many surveys as you want running at one time, with no response limit. SurveyGizmo also does a great job of pulling an overall report. It will autopopulate averages and standard deviations for each question, while still letting you download your responses for a deeper dive. The data is never removed from your account, so you can go back and review old surveys as needed.
A popular and free survey site, Toluna boats more than nine million users across the globe and is well known in the industry, having been running for 17 years. Offering questionnaires for you to fill in to provide leading companies with your opinions, Toluna also runs a range of internal games and schemes, as well as offering product testing to some lucky users who can bag free products.
Here are some great ways to automatically send out your survey, thank and follow up with respondents, analyze your data, and make your survey fit into your workflow. You may be able to do some of these things with your app itself. For everything else, use Zapier, an automation tool that works with hundreds of apps, including many of the survey tools in this roundup.

I just wanted to let you know that SurveyPlanet is a great business tool, helping my organization obtain some really important feedback from key stakeholders. Data we will now be using to refine our customer and volunteer experiences throughout the year. The online survey tools are incredibly user-friendly, and the survey proposition is far more useful than we ever thought it was going to be. SurveyPlanet has enabled us to obtain important information easily and in a format that is powerful and unambiguous. So thank you!

All they need is a Zap that watches for survey responses, then sends out email notifications to various team members based on where the response is from. "For example, if a volunteer selects Cambodia as his location, an email will be sent to the Coke representative in Cambodia containing all pertinent information and details drawn directly from the SurveyGizmo form," says Cuevas. Managing surveys in a large team can be simple with customized email notifications.
You're unlikely to "get rich quick" by taking paid online surveys. You will, however, likely earn or win some extra spending money, or free or discounted goods or services. Doing paid online surveys can be seen as a way to get a fairly steady flow of a decent amount of cash coming in each month. If you enjoy participating in online surveys (especially if you enjoy sharing your opinion for prizes, coupons, and other more typical non-monetary earnings), then paid online surveys is a good choice for you.
When considering an online survey tool, one great way to get acquainted with a product's capabilities is by taking its free version for a spin. These often allow the creation of simple surveys, some of which will even allow unlimited questions and respondents. However, if you're just trying to get some consensus from a group of friends or co-workers regarding a lunch restaurant preference, then you may not need to wade into the waters of dedicated online survey tools because simple polls are already built into Facebook and Twitter. Google Forms is also a free and easy-to-use web product from the omnipresent entity that is ideal for sending out a few simple questions and charting the results—or even tracking them in Google Sheets.
How to Get It: Check out K12 (K12.com) and Connections Academy (ConnectionsAcademy.com). Both organizations offer various benefits—including health insurance, retirement savings accounts and paid time off—depending on where you live. As in any job where you work with kids, there will be a background and reference check as well as interviews. You may also need to be licensed to teach in the state where the students reside.
Watching video ads: Video ads certainly aren't uncommon in the online world. While generally they're a hassle getting in the way of the content you want to watch, many paid survey sites have turned them into a way for members to make money. It's pretty easy to make a tab, set a playlist of paid ads going, mute it, and carry on with browsing the internet or taking surveys.
When explicitly offered the economy as a response, more than half of respondents (58%) chose this answer; only 35% of those who responded to the open-ended version volunteered the economy. Moreover, among those asked the closed-ended version, fewer than one-in-ten (8%) provided a response other than the five they were read; by contrast fully 43% of those asked the open-ended version provided a response not listed in the closed-ended version of the question. All of the other issues were chosen at least slightly more often when explicitly offered in the closed-ended version than in the open-ended version. (Also see “High Marks for the Campaign, a High Bar for Obama” for more information.)
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