You're unlikely to "get rich quick" by taking paid online surveys. You will, however, likely earn or win some extra spending money, or free or discounted goods or services. Doing paid online surveys can be seen as a way to get a fairly steady flow of a decent amount of cash coming in each month. If you enjoy participating in online surveys (especially if you enjoy sharing your opinion for prizes, coupons, and other more typical non-monetary earnings), then paid online surveys is a good choice for you.
Companies might also retain more employees if they enact a work from home benefit. Stanford professor, Nick Bloom, conducted a study to evaluate the benefits of working from home. He found workers were more productive, got more done, worked longer hours, took less breaks, and used less sick time than their in-office counterparts. These employees were also happier and quit less than those who went into the office on a regular basis. He estimated that, on average, the company saved about $2,000 per every employee who worked from home.

It’s a very well-known scam. You cash the check, then they ask you to either wire some of that money back to them as some sort of fee or buy something for them and send the item to them. So, you deposit the check, then wire some cash to them thinking that the check you just deposited will cover that. A few days later, after you already send them the money, the check will bounce and the money you send to them will come out of your own account.


Even better, the national median wage for web developers was $66,130 in 2016, with the top 10% earning an average of $119,550. And you typically don’t need an advanced degree to begin working in this field. All you need is some postsecondary education, applicable experience, and a portfolio of successful sites you’ve built and managed. There are even intensive coding boot camps designed to teach programming skills in just a few short months.
Another way survey packages can make it easier to track different groups of respondents is via multiple "collector" links. These are simply different links to the same survey that can be broken out in analysis later. For example, if you wanted to field a survey to both Facebook and Twitter users, then posting different collector links on each network would let you track from which social network different respondents came.
The point of each survey is to present you with a topic you're interested in and qualified to discuss for the benefit of the researcher. Surveys range in time required, from very short to quite long. Because researchers are looking for opinions only from certain segments of people, you may find you have to try a few surveys before you're qualified to give your opinion on one. Keep at it, and you'll eventually find one that's right up your alley.
While surveys vary widely in how they are conducted and used, there are a number of components that are common across nearly all surveys. Many of these common features have been studied in extensive detail by survey methodologists, psychologists, statisticians, and many other fields of research. The general process of survey research is outlined in the figure below.
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