SurveyMethods can also help you make traditional surveys, with its survey library or an editor where you'll add one question at a time. You can gather responses anonymously, if you need, or print your survey and poll people at your events or stores. Or, you can import your email marketing list, and use SurveyMethods to send your survey to everyone at once.
All they need is a Zap that watches for survey responses, then sends out email notifications to various team members based on where the response is from. "For example, if a volunteer selects Cambodia as his location, an email will be sent to the Coke representative in Cambodia containing all pertinent information and details drawn directly from the SurveyGizmo form," says Cuevas. Managing surveys in a large team can be simple with customized email notifications.

Create a new survey—or employ a pre-made template—and you'll find a survey editor where each question is on its own page with a unique, full-width background image. Instead of having theme options for the entire survey, you can tweak the font, color, opacity and more for each question. And there's still the survey tools you'd expect—tons of question types, branching and logic, and more—inside the fanciest surveys you'll ever see.


Companies are certainly catching onto the trend, and most have the flexibility to work from home, if not at all the time, at least when needed. It’s changing the way we work, especially in the tech sphere. And while it may not be for everybody, employers may find they can save money and increase productivity for some workers. And for some employees, work-from-home benefits may be the difference between an enjoyable and stressful work life.
Today, there are more ways than ever to take the measure of people or at least their digital personas. Particularly in advertising research, many firms stand ready to piece together the trail of online and offline traffic, transactions, and social media activity that we often unconsciously leave. But there are still countless applications for surveys, blends of art and science that seek to enhance understanding of a topic by asking people about what they do or think. Surveys are used to support almost any aspect of a business that intersects with an audience, whether customers or partners. That can include digital marketing campaigns, customer service and helpdesk, employee satisfaction, political polling, event feedback, and many other purposes.
Maybe you have a commute that makes you frustrated before you even hit your desk, and all you can do while you drink your morning coffee is fantasize about what you could buy with all that gas money. For employees who work far from the office, cutting out the commute can make a world of difference for their stress and overall health. For Charlie Harary, CEO of H3 & Company and professor at the Syms School of Business at Yeshiva University, cutting down on how many days a week one of his employees needed to commute allowed one employee to get more done in her working hours. “I have an employee that has a two-hour commute to the office each way. Once day, she mentioned to me that she had to leave early to get home in time to make a family obligation. I asked her why and she detailed out her daily commute. I was shocked by the sheer difficulty it was for her to get to the office each day.”

Surveys shouldn't be tied to desktops and laptops. Odds are, your audience fills out your survey on the go. And you might even find yourself wanting to throw together a new survey on your tablet. SurveyLegend is ready for all of that—it's a survey builder that's equally at home in your traditional browser or a tablet, and the surveys it creates will look great everywhere.
In most ways, iSay is identical to the other sites on the list. One thing which sets them apart is the “Poll Predictor.” If you’ve been on a survey site before, you know one of the most frustrating things is to enter a survey, answer a few questions, and then get kicked out for not qualifying. If this happens with iSay, you get asked a Poll Predictor question. These are questions like “Have you ever been overseas?” and you have to guess what percentage of people said yes. The closer you are to the right answer; the more chances you get for winning the prize drawing.
A work from home job can be any position that does not require you to be in an office. There a wide range of work from home jobs. Some companies offer opportunities for employees in traditional roles to work remotely for all or some of their workweek. These jobs often use technology for meetings, assignments, and collaboration. This practice is called telecommuting. Other work from home opportunities may include jobs such as customer service representatives for which companies will hire remote workers, or part-time virtual assistants to manage work which does not require a physical presence in the office.
Now that you've learned the basics you need to build a survey and have found a survey app to use, you're all ready to create an amazing survey and gather the data you've been needing. But what will you do with all that data? That's what Chapter 8 is for. It's an in-depth guide to optimizing your survey and turning your data into meaningful graphs—complete with template spreadsheets to help you easily analyze your survey data.
In most circumstances, the number of answer choices should be kept to a relatively small number – just four or perhaps five at most – especially in telephone surveys. Psychological research indicates that people have a hard time keeping more than this number of choices in mind at one time. When the question is asking about an objective fact, such as the religious affiliation of the respondent, more categories can be used. For example, Pew Research Center’s standard religion question includes 12 different categories, beginning with the most common affiliations (Protestant and Catholic). Most respondents have no trouble with this question because they can just wait until they hear their religious tradition read to respond.
It’s a common answer when you ask people why they like to work from home. Most will respond that their flexible work environment relieves the amount of stress in their lives and gives them a healthier work-life balance. Today, our offices are constantly on, it isn't the same as it was decades ago, when you left the office and work actually ended. Today, most of us can work at any hour wherever we are located, so it makes sense that the line is starting to blur between work and life. But it stands to reason that working from home can help redefine—or at the very least, rebalance—that line.
Many of my readers have started proofreading from their iPads, scanning legal documents for court reporters as a result of the Proofread Anywhere eCourse I recommend. You can read some of their testimonials in the comments on this post. They offer a 7-day intro course free so you can decide if that line of work is right for you before you pursue the training.
People who work from home have an easier time eating healthy and striking a manageable work-life balance. Eating healthier and having more time to spend with your family can help you feel less stressed, which will make for a happier more productive workday.  A 2011 study from Staples found that employees who worked from home experienced 25 percent less stress. Employees also reported that they were able to maintain a better work-life balance, as well as eat healthier.
Tired of tapping a "+" button to add more answers to your survey questions? SurveyPlanet takes away that pain by automatically adding a blank answer spot as soon as you type an answer in the last blank field. You can tap and type as many times as you need to enter all your answers. Then, you can duplicate your questions in a tap to reword them for detailed branched surveys easily.
Of course, it’s not always easy to increase your income. Your employer might hate giving raises, for example, or maybe overtime at work has become scarce. If that’s the case, you might need to pick up a part-time job, start a side hustle from home, or look for unorthodox ways to earn money in your spare time. Check out our post on how to become an Uber driver, this is a great side hustle because you can make your own schedule and pick up extra cash when its convenient for you.

What It Is: Do people ask you your secret to perfect pie crust or how you made that wreath? "Everyone knows how to do something, or has a hobby they enjoy," says Kimberly Lawson, owner of OohLaLuxe.net, who has created fashion and beauty tutorial videos. "These can easily be turned into profits." Simply sign up for a free YouTube account. Then use a smartphone or digital camera to record yourself explaining and demonstrating how you work your magic. (If you're more tech-savvy or have a burgeoning teenage filmmaker in your house, you can use desktop software, such as Windows Movie Maker, to create a slicker video.) "Once you upload the video to YouTube, enroll in its partner program," Lawson says. YouTube will then place ads inside or near your video, and you will earn money from the ads themselves, video views and click-throughs. "The key is to put a unique spin on your video," says Lawson, especially if there are lots of others on the same subject.
If you're wondering what it'll feel like to take your survey, SurveyPlanet's preview mode is just what you need. It'll show a live copy of your survey that you can fill out, right from the same window where you're editing your survey. You can have the answers display one at a time or in a list—and if you choose the former, expect to be surprised at how quickly they load. It's a fast survey tool that'll help you get answers quickly.
Employees aren’t the only ones who benefit from working from home; a company can benefit just as greatly from a remote employee. “For employers telecommuting can limit absences, increase productivity, and save money. This is most common in the tech sphere because tech companies have the infrastructure to maintain remote workers. With telecommuting the idea of the office space is changing but many are saying that it is for the better," says Ari Zoldan CEO, Quantum Networks, LLC.

But what makes me smile is SurveyGizmo's Survey Diagnostics tools, which uses data from other surveys in SurveyGizmo to estimate the accessibility of your survey, and how long it'll take people to complete. You can even get SurveyGizmo's team to test your survey for you, or invite others' feedback on your survey. That way, you'll get a polished survey others are sure to fill out. A survey that, perhaps, will even make them smile.


Greg Johnson is a personal finance and frugal travel expert who leveraged his online business to quit his 9-5 job, spend more time with his family, and travel the world. With his wife Holly, Greg co-owns two websites – Club Thrifty and Travel Blue Book. The couple has also co-authored a book, Zero Down Your Debt: Reclaim Your Income and Build a Life You'll Love. Find him on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter @ClubThrifty.
Alas, while there are elements of Qualtrics that would be of near-universal benefit, only those individuals creating the most sophisticated surveys can justify its off-the-charts cost. Like a full-frame photo professional's digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera, Qualtrics is not the best choice for novice online survey designers. It provides very little hand-holding or wizards like other tools do. And at $1,500 per year for its entry-level tier, Qualtrics' pricing begins at about where our No. 2 choice SurveyGizmo's pricing tops off.
Ipsos is a funny name for one of the oldest and largest global market research companies. They were founded in 1975 and if you follow US politics, you'll recognize them partnering often with Reuters to produce approval surveys of Congress, the President, and other notable figures. They're headquartered in Paris, France and publicly traded on the Paris Stock Exchange. They have revenues of over a billion dollars – Ipsos i-Say is just a small piece of their business.
Yet there are plenty of companies you’ve probably never heard of, too. Appen, which tops the list, develops high-quality training data for machine learning and artificial intelligence; not surprisingly, they’re hiring web search evaluators and a slew of linguists in lesser known languages like Sudanese Arabic and Xhosa. BCD Travel, the Dutch managed travel provider, is hiring remotely for their customer service, business development and travel consultant roles. Three universities—Grand Canyon, Western Governors and Walden—make the list as well. To say there’s an abundance of work from home jobs available out there would be an understatement. For most people, there are more than they could ever imagine.
Working remotely for an established company is similar to working a desk job except you get to work at home. Most jobs require you to chat with customers online or via the phone, but their biggest draw is the fact that you’ll earn an hourly wage and receive a (relatively) steady paycheck. You’ll usually be asked to work regular hours, but you can do it in your pajamas if you’d like. Even better, some companies might actually provide you with benefits.

One of the most common formats used in survey questions is the “agree-disagree” format. In this type of question, respondents are asked whether they agree or disagree with a particular statement. Research has shown that, compared with the better educated and better informed, less educated and less informed respondents have a greater tendency to agree with such statements. This is sometimes called an “acquiescence bias” (since some kinds of respondents are more likely to acquiesce to the assertion than are others). A better practice is to offer respondents a choice between alternative statements. A Pew Research Center experiment with one of its routinely asked values questions illustrates the difference that question format can make. Not only does the forced choice format yield a very different result overall from the agree-disagree format, but the pattern of answers among better- and lesser-educated respondents also tends to be very different.
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