For employees who can’t afford to be distracted a number of times a day, having a controlled environment can be key to their productivity. Working from home can allow workers to minimize distractions and increase the time they spend focused on a project. It stands to reason that, in the end, companies benefit from these remote employees by getting projects completed faster with fewer mistakes. 
In the middle of all of this is a new breed of research corporation that relies on you – the survey taker – to determine this information.  For your time?  Many survey companies will pay you to take surveys for money or for other cash alternatives like gift cards or physical prizes and rewards. It depends upon the company as to whether they'll offer money or other offers and special deals.
Who can resist the dinging sound of a new email? You, that’s who, especially if you want to stay on task. And forget about signing in to Facebook “just for a minute.” It’s easy to get distracted when you telecommute—unlikely distractions that just don’t exist at work abound at home. At the office, for example, you might visit the company kitchen once in the morning and once in the afternoon for a cup of joe (because that’s what’s appropriate), but at home, you’re hitting the fridge every hour on the hour. Or more.
Renowned for its short and sweet surveys, OnePoll is a great site for dipping in and out of, without having to dedicate loads of time to. As one of the earliest survey sites to be set up, OnePoll certainly has longevity. Founded in the UK, it is open to US users and those further afield and runs polls for the press and leading brands. This means the content is more engaging than it can be elsewhere and you can find yourself answering questions about celebrities or gossip. Many users praise their surveys for being quick, and even better – fun! Topics are not as dry as they can be on other websites, and by keeping the surveys brief, OnePoll is less likely to leave you bored or frustrated.
1. Questionnaire Design. This is the section on which different types of questions are added, edited, and arranged; answer choices are provided, and logic is constructed. Some questionnaire designers have the ability to import skeletal questionnaires from Microsoft Word. However, they offer tools that are commonly used among survey designers. Most products include skip logic, which is the ability to skip over certain parts of a survey and continue at a future question. For example, if respondents answers a phone ownership question saying they have an iPhone, then you might want to skip a question that followed it that asks for their phone brand since you already know it's Apple.
Given that its popularity has ascended to the point where it has become practically a generic name for a survey app, I started my reviews with SurveyMonkey as a baseline package. As it turns out, SurveyMonkey has kept up with the competition pretty well over the years, going far beyond the 80/20 rule one might expect for such a broadly used tool. Both SoGoSurvey and particularly SurveyGizmo—a former Editors' Choice—also represent powerful online survey tools that in many ways exceed what SurveyMonkey offers while preserving much of its look and feel. Any of these would be excellent choices for advanced survey designers. I think SurveyGizmo represents the most capable choice, even though SoGoSurvey has made strong recent improvements in its UI.
While surveys vary widely in how they are conducted and used, there are a number of components that are common across nearly all surveys. Many of these common features have been studied in extensive detail by survey methodologists, psychologists, statisticians, and many other fields of research. The general process of survey research is outlined in the figure below.
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