To a survey taker, a survey may seem like a simple progression of questions. However, while some surveys can be as short as a single question, others can be complex webs of blocks of questions and conditions that sometimes include actual scripting. And even if they don't go quite that far, many surveys call for navigation rules and other choices that can providenot only a better experience for respondents, but also for more precise data collection, which can be critical when that data later transitions to business analysis tools.
You can add full-featured survey questions, with everything from text answers to multiple choices with images and a matrix of answers. There are even rules to skip and branch your survey based on previous answers, and a dashboard to analyze your survey results that you can share with others. It'll even record answers as they're entered, so you'll get all of your results even if some are only partially completed.
Yet there are plenty of companies you’ve probably never heard of, too. Appen, which tops the list, develops high-quality training data for machine learning and artificial intelligence; not surprisingly, they’re hiring web search evaluators and a slew of linguists in lesser known languages like Sudanese Arabic and Xhosa. BCD Travel, the Dutch managed travel provider, is hiring remotely for their customer service, business development and travel consultant roles. Three universities—Grand Canyon, Western Governors and Walden—make the list as well. To say there’s an abundance of work from home jobs available out there would be an understatement. For most people, there are more than they could ever imagine.
Surveys can be super quick and take just a few minutes to fill out, or require around 15 minutes of your time. Five minute surveys pay $0.50 and surveys range from $0.40 up to the higher – and rarer – ones at $10.Paying out by the usual methods, Crowdology does PayPal and also vouchers. Most importantly, the minimum reward threshold is low so when you’ve earned $8, you can cash it out, unlike other sites which make you wait until you have earned much more money. The site offers prize draws from time to time for things like cinema tickets and surveys can be expected weekly.
Hi, ive never done surveys, but I would like to start, thanks for the great info…. I know there are many, many variables, but did I read your article right, did you say 200/year for the average person ? That seems hardly worth it haha…… It seems too me if you join more than 1 site, and are actively doing them daily, or weekly, you should be able to generate almost that monthly?? Maybe its my lack of experience that makes me think that lol.. Thanks Mike
What It Is: Students in countries including Japan, Korea, France and Germany are looking for English speakers to practice with. Sessions focus on things like making professional small talk or running a meeting (trainers are provided with specifics on how to teach each topic, and are also trained themselves for two days before starting the job). Lessons take place either over the phone or on a live Internet video service like Skype—sometimes at night, because you're working with students in different time zones. You need to commit to a minimum of 20 hours a week at consistent times, and can work as many as 35 hours.
Global Test Market is a decent standard of what you're getting yourself involved in.  Their practices are not any more or less shady or reputable than almost any online venue – survey or otherwise.  Just like Facebook, when you identify yourself accurately with Global Test Market, you can expect them to use that information in any way possible to make a penny.  The great news is they inform you and ask for consent first.
Maybe you have a commute that makes you frustrated before you even hit your desk, and all you can do while you drink your morning coffee is fantasize about what you could buy with all that gas money. For employees who work far from the office, cutting out the commute can make a world of difference for their stress and overall health. For Charlie Harary, CEO of H3 & Company and professor at the Syms School of Business at Yeshiva University, cutting down on how many days a week one of his employees needed to commute allowed one employee to get more done in her working hours. “I have an employee that has a two-hour commute to the office each way. Once day, she mentioned to me that she had to leave early to get home in time to make a family obligation. I asked her why and she detailed out her daily commute. I was shocked by the sheer difficulty it was for her to get to the office each day.”

It’s a common answer when you ask people why they like to work from home. Most will respond that their flexible work environment relieves the amount of stress in their lives and gives them a healthier work-life balance. Today, our offices are constantly on, it isn't the same as it was decades ago, when you left the office and work actually ended. Today, most of us can work at any hour wherever we are located, so it makes sense that the line is starting to blur between work and life. But it stands to reason that working from home can help redefine—or at the very least, rebalance—that line.

And you won't have to design your surveys just for one audience, either. FluidSurveys includes support for 64 languages, along with bulk translation tools, so you can make a survey that's ready for much of the world. You can even take PayPal payments in a survey, making them a bit more like a standard form with questions. It's a SurveyMonkey product, it definitely has enough to make it worth considering on its own.

Given that its popularity has ascended to the point where it has become practically a generic name for a survey app, I started my reviews with SurveyMonkey as a baseline package. As it turns out, SurveyMonkey has kept up with the competition pretty well over the years, going far beyond the 80/20 rule one might expect for such a broadly used tool. Both SoGoSurvey and particularly SurveyGizmo—a former Editors' Choice—also represent powerful online survey tools that in many ways exceed what SurveyMonkey offers while preserving much of its look and feel. Any of these would be excellent choices for advanced survey designers. I think SurveyGizmo represents the most capable choice, even though SoGoSurvey has made strong recent improvements in its UI.


In the end, there was one product that stood above all others and that was Qualtrics, which earns our Editors' Choice. Its unique UI, while initially more overwhelming than other products and occasionally requiring more steps than in competitive offerings, does an excellent job of providing a wide array of options while enabling direct access to survey questions. Other powerful and clever touches abound as well.
Today, there are more ways than ever to take the measure of people or at least their digital personas. Particularly in advertising research, many firms stand ready to piece together the trail of online and offline traffic, transactions, and social media activity that we often unconsciously leave. But there are still countless applications for surveys, blends of art and science that seek to enhance understanding of a topic by asking people about what they do or think. Surveys are used to support almost any aspect of a business that intersects with an audience, whether customers or partners. That can include digital marketing campaigns, customer service and helpdesk, employee satisfaction, political polling, event feedback, and many other purposes.

An example of a wording difference that had a significant impact on responses comes from a January 2003 Pew Research Center survey. When people were asked whether they would “favor or oppose taking military action in Iraq to end Saddam Hussein’s rule,” 68% said they favored military action while 25% said they opposed military action. However, when asked whether they would “favor or oppose taking military action in Iraq to end Saddam Hussein’s rule even if it meant that U.S. forces might suffer thousands of casualties,” responses were dramatically different; only 43% said they favored military action, while 48% said they opposed it. The introduction of U.S. casualties altered the context of the question and influenced whether people favored or opposed military action in Iraq.
Define the research question: This is critically important to the success of a survey research project. Without a clearly defined question, it is difficult to determine the best approach for conducting the survey. For example, based on the research question, are the needed data exploratory, descriptive, or causal? The answer to this basic question has huge implications for the entire research process, yet it is often not directly addressed.
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