Survey Junkie uses a point system for their rewards. For every survey you complete, you’ll get anywhere from 50 – 450 points. 100 points equals $1. Unlike some of the other competition, Survey Junkie is very honest about how much you’ll make. They clearly say on their website, “You Will Not Get Rich” taking surveys. This is refreshing to see after so many websites claim you’ll be able to quit your day job and sit at home taking surveys all day.

The apps on this list offer more than that. They help you tackle advanced techniques, like gathering images, recording audio, integrating with calendars, and crafting questions that get unbiased answers. Some are best online, while others shine in mobile apps or in offline world on a clipboard—it's true, several of these survey apps allow you to print out your questionnaire, then add the results to the app. This roundup focuses on survey tools offering standout features, with an emphasis on apps that make it easy to get started.


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Kwik Surveys is a free option that is ad-supported. You can’t customize the templates, but the tool has 30+ to choose from, some of which are nothing short of adorable (you can have a floral theme, or play host to an encouraging group of penguins in your top margin). A handful of the simpler designs are ready to embed on your website, making it even easier for you to collect responses.
One of the most common formats used in survey questions is the “agree-disagree” format. In this type of question, respondents are asked whether they agree or disagree with a particular statement. Research has shown that, compared with the better educated and better informed, less educated and less informed respondents have a greater tendency to agree with such statements. This is sometimes called an “acquiescence bias” (since some kinds of respondents are more likely to acquiesce to the assertion than are others). A better practice is to offer respondents a choice between alternative statements. A Pew Research Center experiment with one of its routinely asked values questions illustrates the difference that question format can make. Not only does the forced choice format yield a very different result overall from the agree-disagree format, but the pattern of answers among better- and lesser-educated respondents also tends to be very different.
Many surveyors want to track changes over time in people’s attitudes, opinions and behaviors. To measure change, questions are asked at two or more points in time. A cross-sectional design, the most common one used in public opinion research, surveys different people in the same population at multiple points in time. A panel or longitudinal design, frequently used in other types of social research, surveys the same people over time. Pew Research Center launched its own random sample panel survey in 2014; for more, see the section on the American Trends Panel.

Hi, ive never done surveys, but I would like to start, thanks for the great info…. I know there are many, many variables, but did I read your article right, did you say 200/year for the average person ? That seems hardly worth it haha…… It seems too me if you join more than 1 site, and are actively doing them daily, or weekly, you should be able to generate almost that monthly?? Maybe its my lack of experience that makes me think that lol.. Thanks Mike
Define the research question: This is critically important to the success of a survey research project. Without a clearly defined question, it is difficult to determine the best approach for conducting the survey. For example, based on the research question, are the needed data exploratory, descriptive, or causal? The answer to this basic question has huge implications for the entire research process, yet it is often not directly addressed.
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