The survey building interface walks you through adding your questions, and is reminiscent of Windows 2000 in its simplicity. You can’t add images or logic to your questions with the free version, but you can mandate answers and give respondents the option of filling out an “other” category for each question. You can also run Likert scale survey questions with Survs.
Two of the packages provided a simpler, cleaner approach to this UI model: the very basic SurveyPlanet and Zoho Survey, the latter being part of a broad suite of web apps available via subscription. Between the two, Zoho Survey emerged as a surprisingly powerful package that could hold its own against apps that took the SurveyMonkey approach. And I recommend it even for those who don't use the other Zoho apps.
I created my first survey in your app in just 15 minutes. I’m a musician and was polling my fans on a selection of songs for my next album. I shared the survey via Facebook and also printed it out to hand out. The Results Section made it simple to summarize all the votes and gave me the demographic info I was looking for as well. I shared the results with my fans and am now busy recording the twelve songs for my next album. Thanks, SurveyPlanet!
If you'd like to tweak your survey's design, there are a few basic templates you can choose from, or you can design your own in CSS. Then, you can share your survey online, or export as a PDF and get answers offline—and then later type those offline entries into Obsurvey's database to keep all of your survey responses together. It's not the prettiest or most advanced survey tool, but it promises "surveys made simple" and lives up to that well.
An example of a wording difference that had a significant impact on responses comes from a January 2003 Pew Research Center survey. When people were asked whether they would “favor or oppose taking military action in Iraq to end Saddam Hussein’s rule,” 68% said they favored military action while 25% said they opposed military action. However, when asked whether they would “favor or oppose taking military action in Iraq to end Saddam Hussein’s rule even if it meant that U.S. forces might suffer thousands of casualties,” responses were dramatically different; only 43% said they favored military action, while 48% said they opposed it. The introduction of U.S. casualties altered the context of the question and influenced whether people favored or opposed military action in Iraq.
For some companies, working from home can be a matter of more hours in the day. This is especially true for small businesses and new companies where they can’t afford to waste even one minute of the workday. “Being a small startup, every hour of the day is important,” says Tim Segraves, co-founder and CTO of Revaluate, “If we all spent an hour of day commuting, that would be almost 20 hours a week that would go to commuting instead of building out our product and business.”
Privacy: 5.0/5.0 – Swagbucks' privacy policy for its own site is excellent; they always tell you exactly how your info will be used. We have not personally received any spam through Swagbucks. As with most other survey sites, Swagbucks does contain links to other sites which may have different privacy policies, so you should be careful when visiting other sites.  You can read Swagbucks' privacy policy yourself here.

For many of us, to work from home is the ultimate indication of freedom. It means that you own both your time and your space, that your life is firmly within your control. Yet not every job can be done from afar. Some jobs, like being a pilot or a flight attendant, must be done from a certain place at a certain time, while others, like being a security consultant or a software developer, are extremely remote-friendly.
Employees aren’t the only ones who benefit from working from home; a company can benefit just as greatly from a remote employee. “For employers telecommuting can limit absences, increase productivity, and save money. This is most common in the tech sphere because tech companies have the infrastructure to maintain remote workers. With telecommuting the idea of the office space is changing but many are saying that it is for the better," says Ari Zoldan CEO, Quantum Networks, LLC.
We've tested hundreds of sites where you can take paid surveys for money and we've found that Swagbucks by far is our #1 pick. They've been around for years and have a solid track record of paying their users. Plus, we also like that they offer opportunities to get paid for doing things other than surveys, like signing up for offers or shopping in their portal.
Of course, FlexJobs is not the only site for finding remote work and jobs you can do from home. Upwork is the largest marketplace for freelancers in the world, with demand for nearly any remote-friendly skill set. Then there are the niche sites, like We Work Remotely, where the majority of job posters are early stage startups looking for talented engineers. Still, FlexJobs may be the winner: its robust, easy-to-navigate system offers tens of thousands of jobs from thousands of employers at any one time. If you’re serious about finding remote work you can do from home or on the road, there’s no better place to look.
If you're wondering what it'll feel like to take your survey, SurveyPlanet's preview mode is just what you need. It'll show a live copy of your survey that you can fill out, right from the same window where you're editing your survey. You can have the answers display one at a time or in a list—and if you choose the former, expect to be surprised at how quickly they load. It's a fast survey tool that'll help you get answers quickly.
Paid survey site companies invest billions of dollars into marketing research online.  They always want to find out more intricate details of a consumer's relationship with their product.  Whether it's a new television show or just an existing product line, companies like Disney, Samsung, and Sony go to great lengths to find out their ideal audiences.
Of course, FlexJobs is not the only site for finding remote work and jobs you can do from home. Upwork is the largest marketplace for freelancers in the world, with demand for nearly any remote-friendly skill set. Then there are the niche sites, like We Work Remotely, where the majority of job posters are early stage startups looking for talented engineers. Still, FlexJobs may be the winner: its robust, easy-to-navigate system offers tens of thousands of jobs from thousands of employers at any one time. If you’re serious about finding remote work you can do from home or on the road, there’s no better place to look.
“I participated in an in-home product trial study. A coffee machine company sent me one of the coffee makers along with about 200 coffee pods. I received $7 for completing 3 short surveys. Plus, after the study, the company said I could keep the coffee maker. So, I got like 4 mos of coffee for everyone in my household, a free coffee maker and $7!” - David W.
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