An example of a wording difference that had a significant impact on responses comes from a January 2003 Pew Research Center survey. When people were asked whether they would “favor or oppose taking military action in Iraq to end Saddam Hussein’s rule,” 68% said they favored military action while 25% said they opposed military action. However, when asked whether they would “favor or oppose taking military action in Iraq to end Saddam Hussein’s rule even if it meant that U.S. forces might suffer thousands of casualties,” responses were dramatically different; only 43% said they favored military action, while 48% said they opposed it. The introduction of U.S. casualties altered the context of the question and influenced whether people favored or opposed military action in Iraq.
1. Questionnaire Design. This is the section on which different types of questions are added, edited, and arranged; answer choices are provided, and logic is constructed. Some questionnaire designers have the ability to import skeletal questionnaires from Microsoft Word. However, they offer tools that are commonly used among survey designers. Most products include skip logic, which is the ability to skip over certain parts of a survey and continue at a future question. For example, if respondents answers a phone ownership question saying they have an iPhone, then you might want to skip a question that followed it that asks for their phone brand since you already know it's Apple.
Companies, brands, and organizations from around the globe are constantly seeking the opinions of people just like you to help shape the products they develop and how they market them. They count on paid online surveys to provide them with reliable information. If you spend time online and enjoy giving your opinion, paid surveys are a great way to earn a little extra cash while helping these companies.
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