Although there are thousands of legitimate work-at-home jobs available, it’s always a good idea to proceed with caution. There are plenty of less than stellar opportunities out there, promising big results with little or no return. While some of these are just bad gigs, others are straight up scams, looking to prey on dreams of those looking for a real work-at-home jobs.
Online surveys are great—they let you get people's opinions, wherever they are, and whenever they're free to fill out your survey. But some surveys are best filled out offline—from door-to-door surveys where you may not have consistent internet coverage, to in-house QA assements inside factories and other areas with limited connectivity—and QuickTapSurvey is a great option to build offline surveys that are perhaps even better than online ones.
As one of the biggest names in survey apps, SurveyMonkey offers more than just a tool to arrange your questions and gather answers. It also includes templates and pre-written questions that are designed to help its users get accurate answers and unbiased results by avoiding conflict of interest and questions that insinuate the "correct" answer (check out SurveyMonkey's post about Survey Bank for more info—and tips on how to make your own questions unbiased). Then, you can check your survey against other survey stats from the same industries in SurveyMonkey's database, giving you a way to benchmark your answers and know what they really mean.

Clayburn Griffin, a digital marketer who finds remote work suits him best, hopes more companies see the benefits that can be gleamed from remote workers, “I really hope employers start to realize this and offer more time to their employees to work from home. I think they don't because they're afraid of abuse and because it feels like there is no oversight. You can't see what an employee is doing, and that feels like giving up some control. All that should matter, though, is that they're getting the work done.”
Or, you might already have an app that includes a survey builder. Many form builder apps include survey templates, and all could be used to make a survey with a little extra work. Marketing automation tools—including email marketing apps like Constant Contact and VerticalResponse—also often include survey builders, so if you're already using one of them for your marketing it might be best to use it for surveys, too.
You'll add your survey questions, typing multiple choice answers in a list instead of having to type each entry separately. There's even answer options that are designed specifically for mobile devices—you can grab locations, scan QR codes, capture images and more right from a survey. Then, you'll deploy your survey to iOS and Android devices, where they can be filled out offline and sync their data back when you're online again. And you can use the same tool to build online surveys for your website, too.

Given that its popularity has ascended to the point where it has become practically a generic name for a survey app, I started my reviews with SurveyMonkey as a baseline package. As it turns out, SurveyMonkey has kept up with the competition pretty well over the years, going far beyond the 80/20 rule one might expect for such a broadly used tool. Both SoGoSurvey and particularly SurveyGizmo—a former Editors' Choice—also represent powerful online survey tools that in many ways exceed what SurveyMonkey offers while preserving much of its look and feel. Any of these would be excellent choices for advanced survey designers. I think SurveyGizmo represents the most capable choice, even though SoGoSurvey has made strong recent improvements in its UI.
The number one reason why I liked MySurvey the best out of the 30-something sites I had the privilege or misfortune to try, was no doubt its versatility. This versatility is present not only in the reward system and the referral program – which are important aspects on their own – but clearly shows in their surveys too. Filling out boring surveys always feels like hard work, even though it’s really not if you think about it. With MySurvey, you will see a huge variety of different topics.

Companies might also retain more employees if they enact a work from home benefit. Stanford professor, Nick Bloom, conducted a study to evaluate the benefits of working from home. He found workers were more productive, got more done, worked longer hours, took less breaks, and used less sick time than their in-office counterparts. These employees were also happier and quit less than those who went into the office on a regular basis. He estimated that, on average, the company saved about $2,000 per every employee who worked from home.


You build your surveys online, relying on a simple interface that lets you type in your question and then pick the answer type. After you deploy the survey to your team's mobile devices, it's displayed full-screen with beautiful background images and large touch-ready buttons. You can then collect responses directly on your iOS and Android devices, and have them show up automatically in LoopSurvey's web app back in the office.
Convenience: 4.5/5.0 – While the sign up form is easy to fill out, you will have to enter more information about yourself up-front than other survey companies ask for. Typically, you just need to enter your email address and create a password to join, but Ipsos also requires your name and physical address. We only gave a slightly lower rating for this because the sign-up process is still very quick and painless.
Similarly, it is important to consider whether certain words may be viewed as biased or potentially offensive to some respondents, as well as the emotional reaction that some words may provoke. For example, in a 2005 Pew Research survey, 51% of respondents said they favored “making it legal for doctors to give terminally ill patients the means to end their lives,” but only 44% said they favored “making it legal for doctors to assist terminally ill patients in committing suicide.” Although both versions of the question are asking about the same thing, the reaction of respondents was different. In another example, respondents have reacted differently to questions using the word “welfare” as opposed to the more generic “assistance to the poor.” Several experiments have shown that there is much greater public support for expanding “assistance to the poor” than for expanding “welfare.”
Many surveyors want to track changes over time in people’s attitudes, opinions and behaviors. To measure change, questions are asked at two or more points in time. A cross-sectional design, the most common one used in public opinion research, surveys different people in the same population at multiple points in time. A panel or longitudinal design, frequently used in other types of social research, surveys the same people over time. Pew Research Center launched its own random sample panel survey in 2014; for more, see the section on the American Trends Panel.
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