Many companies are looking for input from people that have knowledge or experience with the subject of the survey they are offering. For example, if you are a major toy company looking to perfect a new toy meant for infants, it’s very likely they will ask a few preliminary questions (a qualifier) to make sure the people that take the survey have experience with children and toys (e.g. parents). Survey eligibility can greatly vary, from being as specific as “someone who has experience with a particular pharmaceutical medication” to “males between 25-45 years of age.”
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What It Is: Transcription essentially involves you listening to audio files and typing out what you hear. Easy enough, right? Companies usually hire transcriptionists without much experience, so some job postings might only require you to have a computer and keyboard to get started. Transcription jobs can vary from transcribing a college lecture to a doctor's medical dictation, while most companies allow you to make your own schedule.
In most ways, iSay is identical to the other sites on the list. One thing which sets them apart is the “Poll Predictor.” If you’ve been on a survey site before, you know one of the most frustrating things is to enter a survey, answer a few questions, and then get kicked out for not qualifying. If this happens with iSay, you get asked a Poll Predictor question. These are questions like “Have you ever been overseas?” and you have to guess what percentage of people said yes. The closer you are to the right answer; the more chances you get for winning the prize drawing.

For companies, one of the major dangers of paid online surveys is that you are giving participants an incentive to lie and cheat in order to take more surveys [source: Selling to Kids]. People might lie on their demographic profile to qualify for more surveys. They might sign up with the same company under multiple e-mail addresses to maintain several different profiles. They might rush through multiple-choice surveys randomly checking answers in order to complete the survey in the least amount of time possible.


“I first learned about TTEC from the university I was attending. I thought it would be a great idea to get a job working from home while going to school. When I first started working for the company, I was a seasonal agent. This grew into a permanent agent position. TTEC has enabled me to earn a degree, provide support to my family, gain skills in communication and technology, and meet great people from different parts of the world. What a wonderful company to work for! Every day is a great day here at TTEC!”
Holly fell into freelance writing on a whim. She submitted several pitches for guest posts and ended up landing a few clients. After roughly 6 months of freelancing on the side, she was making enough money to replace her income and work at home full-time. Now, she makes over $200,000 a year from writing alone. Not bad for a home-based business, eh?
This is a good option if you’re asking basic questions and only need to use multiple choice, multi-select, and open-answer formats. The answer options can be randomized, making your results more reliable by combating any selection bias that might be hidden in the answer order. The lack of page or question logic, however, makes it harder to ask follow-up questions.
“Join my team” pitches – There are plenty of real ways to be your own boss and work for yourself. Unfortunately, these opportunities are often drowned out by the “join my team” pitches common at multi-level marketing jobs (MLMs). While not necessarily a scam in all cases, many of these companies require you to buy product, which means you’ll end up spending far more money than you’ll ever earn. If there is more money to be made by recruiting others to join your team than there is than by actually selling the product, it’s probably an MLM and best to just stay away.
At work, you had to keep your desk neat so that you looked organized—and sure, it’s always helpful to see the top of your desk. But at home, who cares if clutter collects around you? Well, don’t fall into that trap (especially video conference calls are part of your routine). While you might miss the building services team, who used to wipe down your crusty keyboard and empty your waste paper baskets every night, it’s ultimately up to you to keep your space spic and span so you can do your best work.
We've tested hundreds of sites where you can take paid surveys for money and we've found that Swagbucks by far is our #1 pick. They've been around for years and have a solid track record of paying their users. Plus, we also like that they offer opportunities to get paid for doing things other than surveys, like signing up for offers or shopping in their portal.
Ipsos are a globally respected name when it comes to opinion polls and market research, and by taking part in their surveys you can help them gain the vital information that helps them make business, consumer and political predictions. Unlike many of the other sites to feature in our Survey Cool 2018 top twenty it focuses solely and purely on offering surveys. It also means you won’t be distracted by video watching and game playing that typically pays a lot less. Here is a detailed review of Ipsos I-Say.
After you have registered, we invite you to take part in online surveys by email. In the invitation email you will find a link to the questionnaire along with a brief description of the survey topic. The survey begins as soon as you click on the link: you will be asked questions that you can then answer by simply clicking on an option or entering text.
One other challenge in developing questionnaires is what is called “social desirability bias.” People have a natural tendency to want to be accepted and liked, and this may lead people to provide inaccurate answers to questions that deal with sensitive subjects. Research has shown that respondents understate alcohol and drug use, tax evasion and racial bias; they also may overstate church attendance, charitable contributions and the likelihood that they will vote in an election. Researchers attempt to account for this potential bias in crafting questions about these topics. For instance, when Pew Research Center surveys ask about past voting behavior, it is important to note that circumstances may have prevented the respondent from voting: “In the 2012 presidential election between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, did things come up that kept you from voting, or did you happen to vote?” The choice of response options can also make it easier for people to be honest; for example, a question about church attendance might include three of six response options that indicate infrequent attendance. Research has also shown that social desirability bias can be greater when an interviewer is present (e.g., telephone and face-to-face surveys) than when respondents complete the survey themselves (e.g., paper and web surveys).
“I participated in an in-home product trial study. A coffee machine company sent me one of the coffee makers along with about 200 coffee pods. I received $7 for completing 3 short surveys. Plus, after the study, the company said I could keep the coffee maker. So, I got like 4 mos of coffee for everyone in my household, a free coffee maker and $7!” - David W.
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