What It Is: Many companies pay online testers to make sure websites are intuitive and easy to navigate. "You basically follow the instructions you're given to check out the website," says Anna Thurman, founder of RealWaysToEarnMoneyOnline.com, a site that has reviewed more than 500 online work opportunities. "It usually only takes about 15 minutes per test." Thurman recommends registering with 10 to 12 different companies since the opportunities to test these sites are doled out first come, first served. "There are people who make $100 to $200 a month by staying on top of those tests," Thurman says.
Many online job platforms such as Upwork.com also have their own system for recognizing and removing job scams. According to the site, many of them involve “employers” who try to pay workers outside the site’s payment system, and engage in some sort of check or money order fraud. For more tips on avoiding job scams on freelancing sites, read about it here.

Congratulations go to Panel Place, which gets 2nd place on the Survey Cool list of the best paid survey sites for 2018, but just what makes it so good? Above all else is the fact that it has a very large number of surveys to choose from, so there really is something for everyone. It does this because it includes surveys available from a variety of other top survey providers, including Toluna and Valued Opinions. It’s available to users across the world as well, and payment can be made by way of a gift card or sent securely to a PayPal account. It’s a deserving number one.
Everyone has an opinion, well now Opinion Plus will convert your opinion into cash in your pocket thanks to its intuitive and easy to use paid survey site. It scores highly because the surveys are tailored to each individual user, and yet they still send regular invites so you won’t be waiting around for something to do or, even worse, filling in surveys that you aren’t eligible for and won’t get paid for. They send payments via PayPal only, but their payout rate is among the best that we’ve seen.
Many companies are looking for input from people that have knowledge or experience with the subject of the survey they are offering. For example, if you are a major toy company looking to perfect a new toy meant for infants, it’s very likely they will ask a few preliminary questions (a qualifier) to make sure the people that take the survey have experience with children and toys (e.g. parents). Survey eligibility can greatly vary, from being as specific as “someone who has experience with a particular pharmaceutical medication” to “males between 25-45 years of age.”

Here are some great ways to automatically send out your survey, thank and follow up with respondents, analyze your data, and make your survey fit into your workflow. You may be able to do some of these things with your app itself. For everything else, use Zapier, an automation tool that works with hundreds of apps, including many of the survey tools in this roundup.
Kwik Surveys lets you fully export your results in multiple file types, meaning you can analyze your results in Excel or statistics software of choice. Why does this matter? Instead of just seeing your overall results, you can manipulate the data and get useful insights by testing for significance or putting related questions together in crosstabs. Kwik Surveys will clear your data after six months, so exporting is key if you want to keep a record of the surveys you’ve already run.
An example of a wording difference that had a significant impact on responses comes from a January 2003 Pew Research Center survey. When people were asked whether they would “favor or oppose taking military action in Iraq to end Saddam Hussein’s rule,” 68% said they favored military action while 25% said they opposed military action. However, when asked whether they would “favor or oppose taking military action in Iraq to end Saddam Hussein’s rule even if it meant that U.S. forces might suffer thousands of casualties,” responses were dramatically different; only 43% said they favored military action, while 48% said they opposed it. The introduction of U.S. casualties altered the context of the question and influenced whether people favored or opposed military action in Iraq.
Assimilation effects occur when responses to two questions are more consistent or closer together because of their placement in the questionnaire. We found an example of an assimilation effect in a Pew Research poll conducted in November 2008 when we asked whether Republican leaders should work with Obama or stand up to him on important issues and whether Democratic leaders should work with Republican leaders or stand up to them on important issues. People are more likely to say that Republican leaders should work with Obama when the question was preceded by the one asking what Democratic leaders should do in working with Republican leaders (81% vs. 66%). However, when people were first asked about Republican leaders working with Obama, fewer said that Democratic leaders should work with Republican leaders (71% vs. 82%).
Now that you've picked an app to build your survey, and have put together the questions you need answered, there's one more thing you need: automation. Your new survey builder is likely great, with dashboards and notifications and reports and more. But chances are, you'll want something more—better ways to analyze your data, follow up with people who filled out your survey, and automatically send your survey to your new customers.
Some products also include display logic, which is the ability to show or hide a question or section of a survey based on conditions that occurred before it. This can require far less upfront planning, although a few products in our review roundup implemented it very poorly, preventing question order from changing after setting it up. On the other hand, some packages that can accommodate particularly long and complex surveys can divide questions into sets or blocks; this can make it much easier to keep track of questions that pertain to a similar subtopic, for example.

Survey Junkie uses a point system for their rewards. For every survey you complete, you’ll get anywhere from 50 – 450 points. 100 points equals $1. Unlike some of the other competition, Survey Junkie is very honest about how much you’ll make. They clearly say on their website, “You Will Not Get Rich” taking surveys. This is refreshing to see after so many websites claim you’ll be able to quit your day job and sit at home taking surveys all day.
The concept of data mining and profiting off that data mining isn't anything new.  And while some companies engage in some rather disreputable practices to do this, Global Test Market seems to be doing just fine with the whole “consent to disclose” thing.  More importantly, in some cases this may help you as some companies will offer to do more specialized product testing once they've identified you as their target demographic.
Actually after spending these few months meeting people in meetups, there is this one survey software API that I think we all need. A social profile matching software (like a dating software showing % of personality matching). But it is every individual had its own personal database of questions instead (for every category of questions we also get answering same type of questions meeting new people eg profession,position, work experience, interest/hobby, etc) What if we can each build a database of thousands of different questions answer on a scale of 1-5 and the application will just auto compare all those questions and show up with 2 circles which are the interception of our common interest or personality etc. Eg What is your view on gay marriage? If you put 1 on strong agree and me 5 strongly disagree, then it can also tell us its a topic we should not touch on for a first meeting.
There are several steps involved in developing a survey questionnaire. The first is identifying what topics will be covered in the survey. For Pew Research Center surveys, this involves thinking about what is happening in our nation and the world and what will be relevant to the public, policymakers and the media. We also track opinion on a variety of issues over time so we often ensure that we update these trends on a regular basis so we can understand whether people’s opinions are changing.
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