At work, you had to keep your desk neat so that you looked organized—and sure, it’s always helpful to see the top of your desk. But at home, who cares if clutter collects around you? Well, don’t fall into that trap (especially video conference calls are part of your routine). While you might miss the building services team, who used to wipe down your crusty keyboard and empty your waste paper baskets every night, it’s ultimately up to you to keep your space spic and span so you can do your best work.
FlexJobs, the Boulder-based remote-friendly career postings site, is cutting through the complexity of this question. Each year, they compile a list of the top 100 companies hiring remote workers. This year, though, they’ve created a special list of all the companies who have made their top 100 lists for each of the past five years. While many companies require you to clock in and out each day, the employers on this list don’t care whether you do your work from Santorini or Shanghai.
Taking paid surveys can become a well paying job if you work hard enough at it but you won’t start bring in buckets of money right from the start. But don’t let that demotivate you to start taking paid surveys. In the beginning you don’t have control over the survey offers you receive, but if you keep at it then after some time your per-survey-rate will go up as you become a more reliable source for paid survey companies. Then you’ll be surprised how much extra money you can make without putting in very much effort at all.
We've tested hundreds of sites where you can take paid surveys for money and we've found that Swagbucks by far is our #1 pick. They've been around for years and have a solid track record of paying their users. Plus, we also like that they offer opportunities to get paid for doing things other than surveys, like signing up for offers or shopping in their portal.
3. Reporting. As survey responses come in or after a survey is complete, you'll want to see how people responded. All products have the ability to see how individual respondents answered all questions. They can also generate at least basic bar and pie charts to provide simple visualization along with some way to export both the data (often in a spreadsheet-ready form) and the charts (often in a format such as PDF or Microsoft PowerPoint). More advanced products can augment these charts with various measures such as averages and response count, and then filter the results based on the responses to different questions. Or they can produce crosstabs, share customized reports with colleagues, and even dip into more analyses that require a bit of statistics expertise.
While surveys vary widely in how they are conducted and used, there are a number of components that are common across nearly all surveys. Many of these common features have been studied in extensive detail by survey methodologists, psychologists, statisticians, and many other fields of research. The general process of survey research is outlined in the figure below.
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